Women's Health

Douching: What you need to know

There’s nothing quite like those fresh-outta-the-shower feels! You’re refreshed, ready to take on the day, and you’ve even got your hair washing schedule perfectly synced with your social calendar. #WINNING. But, while you know how to keep your hair and yourself squeaky clean, you may have often wondered – do the same rules apply for down there? Should you use soap, water only… or even try out douching? Read on sis, we’re here to unpack all the important questions about keeping your downstairs healthy. 

So, what exactly IS douching? 

Basically, douching refers to washing out the vagina with water or other fluids. A douche itself is a prepackaged mix of water and vinegar, baking soda or iodine, that comes ready to buy in a bottle or bag. Typically, you use it by squirting it upwards into the vagina, through a tube or nozzle. The mixture then comes back out through the vagina, having rinsed out the inside of it. There is much more to douching than just a quick, gentle rinse ladies! 

How helpful is douching?

Okay so, are douches safe? We get it, we all want to smell good and keep it clean down there! But while some women might say that douching makes them feel cleaner, the negatives FAR outweigh the benefits. Your vagina contains a lot of good bacteria and this bacteria maintains the ideal pH balance in your vagina, which is actually slightly acidic. Douching can upset this natural balance of bacteria and normal pH levels, which can lead to a number of unwanted, nasty health problems such as; yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease. It can even create problems related to pregnancy, like difficulty conceiving and preterm birth. In short, douching is definitely more harmful than helpful! 

Douching on your period

Okay, but what about when it comes to my period? Should I douche at that time of the month? Will douching stop my period?The simple answer is no. No matter where you are at in your monthly cycle, douching during period isn’t necessary. Our vagina is designed to be self-cleaning, by flushing out fluids, cells and bacteria through discharge. This process naturally keeps your downstairs clean, moist, helps to prevent any nasty infections, as well as maintaining a healthy pH balance. Pretty cool, right? While odours can be stronger during your period, douching will only cover this up for a short amount of time and might actually cause worse problems (like an infection). And while it might clear out some blood temporarily, menstrual blood will continue to flow as usual. In actual fact, your vagina is technically cleaning itself during your period by shedding the lining of your uterus; so it’s best to just let it do its thang, girlfriend!

How to keep it clean down there

So, what IS the best way to keep your downstairs healthy and clean? We recommend leaving this job to the expert – which is actually your vagina itself! Yup, it’s best to let your vagina simply self-clean the inside, which it does naturally. No need for douching

In addition to this, maintaining good daily personal hygiene habits and cleaning the outside of your vagina with warm water will do the trick. While we recommend steering clear from douching, scented soaps and body washes, you can always use a feminine hygiene wash. These washes are natural, pH-balanced, gentle and are designed to naturally cleanse this area without causing irritation. Plus, they’re safe to use during your period. If your skin is on the sensitive side or you currently have a vaginal infection, it’s best to skip any product that might cause further irritation. 

Girls, please keep in mind that a little odour is totes normal! Especially during times of increased activity, like playing sports and exercising. If you’re ever really worried about how it smells down there or something seems a little out of the ordinary, a visit to your GP is always your best option.

Love, Libra x

Anything else? Asaleo Care makes no warranties or representations regarding the completeness or accuracy of the information. This information should be used only as a guide and should not be relied upon as a substitute for professional, medical or other health professional advice.